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Measuring brain synchrony between children and their parents while drawing pictures


Summary

Measuring brain synchrony between children (both with or without an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis) and their parents while drawing pictures together.


Call to action

Does your child enjoy drawing pictures? Consider participating in our study. We are trying to understand how parents and children synchronize brain activity while drawing pictures together. While drawing the pictures you and your child’s brain activity will be measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) which is non-invasive and has no known risks.


Who can participate

Children aged 7-18 (with or without autism spectrum disorder) and their parent or primary caregiver who is willing to participate with your child. Participants must be able to sit and focus on a task for at least 2 minutes. Participants must be able to understand English and have normal or correct-to-normal vision/hearing. Participants are required to have complete mobility of their dominant hand and torso. Participants must have no history of neurological, cardiopulmonary, respiratory, or drug/alcohol related conditions as well as traumatic brain injury or concussion.


Funding agency

PRISM Lab, Kimel Family Foundation


What's involved

  • You and your child will participate in one, 1 hour long session at the Bloorview Research Institute, where we will measure your brain activity while drawing pictures and playing ‘Simon Says’.
  • You and your child will wear a caps that measures brain activity using NIRS and your body movements will be video recorded.
  • You and your child will receive a small token of appreciation for your time.

Deadline


Interested in participating

If you are interested in participating in this study or have additional questions, please contact Karly Franz at kfranz@hollandbloorview.ca or 416-425-6220 extension 3270 with your interest, and they will get back to your shortly. Contacting us does not obligate you or your child to participate in the study.


Learn more about this study